The best bed sheets and best duvet covers UK 2024

The best bed sheets and best duvet covers UK 2024


The best bed sheets and best duvet covers UK 2024

<h2 class=”body-h2″>What fabric is best for bedding? </h2><p>We haven’t got any polyester bedding on this list, as it’s not very breathable (although it can be more durable and affordable). But we have tested a range of other textiles in pursuit of the best duvet cover and sheets. They’re all natural fibres as they allow air to circulate more effectively – here’s a handy breakdown of each. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>Cotton </h3><p>This is the classic bedding textile. It’s breathable and soft, and what you’ll usually find in hotels. <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/g32219227/egyptian-cotton-bedding/” target=”_blank”>Egyptian cotton</a> is considered the most luxe type due to its longer, finer yarns, which make for a softer and more drapey fabric. </p><p>There are two common types of weave for cotton bedding: <strong>percale and sateen</strong> (or satin weave). Percale bedding is considered the more cooling of the two, as it’s crisper and smoother, with a slightly looser weave. </p><p>Sateen on the other hand looks glossy and feels silky smooth, but due to the tighter weave needed to achieve this finish, it can be more warming. In theory, it may crease less than too, which is ideal if you like a wrinkle-free finish in your bedroom, but draw the line at <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/product-reviews/house-garden/g689767/best-steam-irons/” target=”_blank”>ironing</a> your sheets. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>Linen </h3><p>Made from flax, <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/g31133489/linen-bedding/” target=”_blank”>linen</a> is in some ways a more environmentally friendly choice than cotton, because it requires less water to grow. It’s harder to cultivate and spin, however, making it pricier. </p><p>Linen is durable though, so should last you a long time. Plus, it’s naturally antimicrobial and breathable, as it generally has a lower thread count than cotton and looser weave, making your bed airier. </p><p>While linen sheets are wrinkly (and not all can be ironed), their laid-back look is increasingly popular. They aren’t always as soft as cotton, but generally, the fibre relaxes over time, so within a few washes, they can feel indulgently luxe. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>Bamboo and eucalyptus <strong></strong> </h3><p>Essentially, these textiles are like rayon or viscose; wood pulp from both plants is processed and transformed into a <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/lifestyle/g46360213/best-eye-masks/” target=”_blank”>silk</a>-like fabric. Because the plants are fast-growing, they can regenerate quickly, which is why they are considered an eco-friendlier choice. </p><p>Both are naturally moisture wicking and hypoallergenic. Unsurprisingly, given how they are often likened to silk, they’re sumptuously soft, too. What’s more, they share many of the same properties that might inspire you to invest in a <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/beauty/skincare/g45556851/best-silk-pillowcases/” target=”_blank”>silk pillowcase</a>, making them a good pick for your skin and hair.</p><h2 class=”body-h2″>What is the best thread count for sheets? </h2><p>Thread count refers to the number of threads there are per square inch of fabric. Higher counts can be an indicator of quality and are thought to result in softer and more durable fabrics. </p><p>The only fabric where thread count is really important is cotton (and even then, it’s not the be-all and end-all). But between 300 and 500 is generally the sweet spot for the best thread count. </p><h2 class=”body-h2″>Sustainability claims to look out for </h2><p>It’s increasingly common to find products with environmental claims on the market, so here’s a quick cheat sheet for the logos to look out for.</p><h3 class=”body-h3″>Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) </h3><p>If you buy anything with organic cotton, this is one of the most stringent <a href=”https://global-standard.org/the-standard” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>certifications</a> as it involves independent verification of a product’s entire supply chain. To qualify for the label, 70 per cent of the fibre used must be organic (and if the product is branded as exclusively ‘organic’ this goes up to 95%), which means there are no synthetic pesticides, herbicides or GMOs used.</p><p>Additionally, there must be a safe working environment with no child or forced labour, and no harmful chemicals used in processing either. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>OEKO TEX Standard 100 </h3><p>This <a href=”https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/oeko-tex-standard-100″ target=”_blank” rel=”noreferrer noopener”>label</a> is more focused on human health, as it shows that textiles have been tested for (and are free from) harmful substances. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>OEKO-TEX Made In Green </h3><p>This builds on the Standard 100 and <a href=”https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/oeko-tex-made-in-green” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>covers</a> sustainability and ethical production. To qualify, products are tested for harmful substances, chemical management and wastewater are monitored, and workers must have fair wages and working hours, and safe conditions. They also offer a <a href=”https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/label-check” target=”_blank” rel=”noreferrer noopener”>label check service</a> for greater transparency. </p><h3 class=”body-h3″>B Corp </h3><p>This certification is awarded to whole companies, rather than on a product-by-product basis. To qualify, a business must meet a range of criteria about how it’s run, what its workplace environment is like, and the impact it has on the communities it operates in and the environment. You can read <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/consumer-advice/consumer-rights/a40574035/b-corp-certification/” target=”_blank”>more about this here</a>. </p><h2 class=”body-h2″>How we test bedding </h2><p>Nearly 100 panellists snuggled up in a new bed set for at least a month, to see if they are worthy of your money. They reported back to our experts about each set’s comfort, smoothness, breathability and overall design, including how easy they found making the bed, and if the bedding washes well. </p><p>In the <a href=”https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/product-reviews/a24657702/good-housekeeping-institute-product-reviews/” target=”_blank”>lab</a>, our experts take a double duvet cover and wash it three times, before measuring for shrinkage and assessing any change in textile quality. As part of this test, we wash two different shades from each range to check for any colour fading with our specialist tech. Generally, testers use a medium shade and a dark shade. They also judge how easy it is to use. </p><p>Time for bed… </p><p class=”body-tip”>All prices are for a UK double. Where available in a set, this is what we have linked to, but for items available separately, you’ll find the duvet covers below.</p><p><em>Love Good Housekeeping and want more of our Triple-Tested recipes, home tips, fashion inspiration, essential consumer advice and so much more delivered to your inbox? <a href=”https://link.goodhousekeeping.co.uk/join/signup-good-housekeeping” title=”https://link.goodhousekeeping.co.uk/join/signup-good-housekeeping” data-outlook-id=”f27ce123-c087-46b2-811c-0ab698e426a0″ target=”_blank”>Sign up</a> to our FREE weekly newsletters, sit back and enjoy!</em></p>”/>

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